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Vegan Arguments Worth Arguing

If your news/Twitterfeed is  relentlessly swamped with vegan tidbits/petitions/news like mine then you might have come across Jeremy Clarkson’s latest foray into veganism. The woebegone presenter, whose redundant ego couldn’t afford a better argument for veganism than ‘if you like cows then eat meat because they will become extinct,’ caused a bit of a stir. Thankfully it was more of the eye rolling variety.

JC

I’m sure cows are quite capable of breeding without our help thank you very much, although perhaps you’re right maybe they have forgotten how?

Personally I think this kind of argument isn’t even worthy of a response. But I’m sure some Clarkson’s sheep appreciated the weary dig enough to keep his jaded career afloat.

Anyway this got me thinking about all the annoying and repetitive arguments us vegan folk face day to day.

It’s too expensive:

Definitely worth a response:

When omnivores think about veganism they immediately assume that free-from items are all horribly expensive. In my experience it’s only plant milk that is a lot more than its dairy opposition. While the truth of this may be off-putting, it is wise to point out how unhealthy cow’s milk is to humans and that there are other options besides cereal in the morning.

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Dairy-free/vegan is immediately bracketed in the ‘health food’ category by many, which by default means expensive. For the food that happens to be both healthy and vegan, if more people consume it, demand will drive prices down.

In an article I read promoting ‘part-time veganism,’ an obnoxious Londoner reveals the harsh reality of not being able to knock up Carbonara sauce without soaking cashews/ trundling to the health store four buses away, beforehand.

Admittedly there are changes to be made when you switch to being vegan and one of those might be sacrificing Carbonara sauce from a jar. But there are plenty of other options Mrs could have taken for a quick meal fix, if she really cared about being vegan (which she didn’t).

 You’re not vegan if you go on a plane:

Definitely not worth it! A wearisome troll attempted to belittle my ethical choices on Twitter using this poppycock logic! So I applauded his argument and denounced my veganism immediately.

As someone clever said once: ‘It’s impossible to argue with stupid people.’

I’ve always  believed it’s up to the vegan individual  where they draw a line, whether that be honey, wool or ahem Carbonara sauce or flying. To completely eliminate our footprint on Earth would basically mean dying. So have that faceless, internet lurking parasites!

But it’s too hard!

I personally think rather than ‘too hard,’ it’s more a habitual issue; people are reluctant to change what they are used to. But once you’ve ‘transitioned’ (apologies for sounding culty) you get to know which products are animal friendly, where to find them, which meals are easy/cheap and which chains cater for vegans (there are many).

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Western culture is finally embracing veganism in a way it never has before, making it a lot more accessible and ‘normal.’ Unless All Bar One, Zizzi and Wetherspoon are cults? OK, I’ll admit the last one has potential.

Plants though!

Sigh. This one has been regurgitated to a fine, unadulterated pulp by smug meat-eaters trying to catch us out. Plants do not have feelings, and humans need to live on something. If fruit doesn’t get picked it will fall from the tree before rotting, so what’s the difference?

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Yes, yes I know… technically animals eventually die and rot too, but so do we. Plants are not sentient. There- I said it.

If we all went vegan farmers would be out of business:

Arguable. OK admittedly it’d be a huge turn around- like of Trump/Brexit esteem, bigger even. But with an infra-structure in place (Theresa) then technically, at least in the western world, it could happen. The hardest part would be convincing everyone.

While anomalous, there are meat and dairy farmers who have at some point in their career, shed their thick skins and bared their souls to the immorality of their heinous livelihood.

Former pig and sheep farmer Bob Comis is in the process of planting fruit and veg crops to replace his ‘live stock.’ In a blog post entitled The Grapple of Ethics he writes:

“Because I give the pigs lives that are as close to natural as is possible in an unnatural system, I am honourable, I am just, I am humane, while all the while behind the shroud, I am a slaveholder and a murderer.”

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Watch this beautiful piece of spoken word by the son of a meat farmer from Yorkshire. I welled up the first time I watched this- then again I had had a tipple or two!

Research has revealed that 8 million deaths could be avoided annually if the world went vegan.

Plantations would exist in place of animal farms which currently take up 68% of agricultural land which globally makes up 12 billion acres. This leaves a huge surplus of land currently used to produce animal feed; this could be claimed back by our natural environment and used to encourage biodiversity. That or we no longer need to worry about preserving the green belt!

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And boom! So we’re all going vegan now yes?

Yes??

 

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