Experiments

Bean Sproutin’!

Seed sprouts seem to be one of those healthful things that have stealthily crept into our sub-conscious somehow or other, so Marc was very excited when he purchased this on Amazon:

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We planted the Alfalfa seeds that were included,like good boys and girls. It was all very exciting. Though I’ll be honest, we didn’t have a clue what to do with them.

A bit like when you’re anticipating having a baby and when it finally comes along you’re just incredulous. (OK so it’s not quite the same). They ended up getting lost in a stir fry on this occasion because according to Google, raw is not always best! But we imagined the little seeds spreading their life-giving goodness around our insidey bits as we ate.

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With my new lust for sprouting, I went a’rummaging, and found some dry chickpeas from the early days when dreams were big.

And just look at them now!

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Not all the chickpeas had sprouted and some more than others, so I had a bit of an uneven batch. Various sources advise sprouts with just a short tail, roughly 1/4 inch are at their most edible. I plucked most of tailed ones out to make hummus, and ate some of the longer ones. They tasted sweet and earthy.

I put most of them in and left the ones that hadn’t sprouted at all. Perhaps I’d overcrowded the trays.

I used this recipe as a guide, but in the end I used tahini to give the flavour a bit more depth and only used 3 cloves of garlic instead of 4-8 (8!). I also made the mistake of putting water in first (duh) so I had to sift through more adolescent chickpeas to bulk it out. I guess I didn’t really follow the recipe at all…

In comparison to un-raw hummus, it tasted a lot more earthy and sweet. I apparently don’t have a high speed food processor so the texture was a little bitty but this certainly didn’t ruin what was a very hearty and nutritious lunch!

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